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Posts Tagged ‘College’

Back to School: Spotlighting Campus Crimes and Violence…

July 12, 2011 Comments off

It is time to get ready for campus life, with September right around the corner.  Project Safe Girls wants you to be aware and prepared. Awareness is a good first step toward protecting yourself. Being prepared is the best defense.

Campus crimes occur much more frequently than any of us realize. Crimes on College Campuses and crimes nearby college campuses frequently go unreported and/or under reported. A recent study by The U.S. Department of Justice on The Sexual Victimization of College Women reveals some disturbing statistics. Among the findings:

  • Annually 4.9% of college Co-Eds experience a rape. In other words, the victimization rate is 49 rapes per 1000 female students.
  • When one considers that the average college career now lasts 5 years, there is a 25% likelihood of a rape between Freshman Orientation and Graduation Day.
  • This data becomes more disturbing when analyzed by the number of incidents rather than the number of victims. When the analysis is based on incident count the rate increases by nearly 30%. This takes into account women who have been victimized more than once.
  • Crimes categorized as sexual victimization other than rape touched 3.4%, or 34 per 1000, college Co-Eds annually.
  • This data also becomes more disturbing when analyzed by the number of incidents rather than the number of victims. Analyzed this way, the rate increases by a whopping 397%.
  • 9 out of 10 victims know the person who sexually victimizes them.
  • 71% of sexual victimization of college women occurs on a date – known more commonly as date rape.
  • 88%of sexual crimes against women occur between the hours of 6 pm and 6 am.
  • Sexual victimization of college Co-Eds most often occurs in a residence (on or off campus), with nearly 60% occurring in the victim’s own residence, 30% occurring in other campus living quarters and 10% at a Fraternity.
  • Overwhelmingly, data indicates that women who attempt to protect or defend themselves avoid becoming the victim of a completed rape. While protecting or defending oneself is not a 100% guarantee, it is overwhelmingly the best action to take in order to avoid becoming the victim of a completed rape.
  • In the instances where women used force or a self-defense product like pepper spray, Mace, a stun gun or a Taser, just under 31% of the attempted rapes resulted in completed rapes.
  • Shockingly, fewer than 5% of completed or attempted rapes are actually reported to law enforcement officials. Reasons indicated for not doing so include: Not serious enough to report; not clear a crime was committed; not wanting family or others to know; lack of proof; fear of reprisal by the assailant; fear of hostility by police and fear police would not believe the incident occurred or was serious enough.
  • Another frequent and unwanted violation of women on college campuses is stalking. An annual incidence rate 156.5 stalkings per 1000 Co-Eds is reported. Clearly this is a bigger problem and requires further attention, study and consideration.

If you are assaulted or in a dating violence relationship PLEASE REPORT THE INCIDENT to your campus police department AND PRESS CHARGES!  ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS PRESS CRIMINAL CHARGES!  And, I strongly suggest that you go to the local DV or Rape Crisis agency in your college community as well as filing a POLICE REPORT WITH THE TOWN/CITY POLICE DEPARTMENTS!  Cover all of your bases.  Do not leave any rock unturned.

Too many assailants, universities and colleges are getting away with sweeping college crimes under the carpet.  DO NOT ALLOW THIS TO HAPPEN TO YOU!  Remember, YOU DID NOT DESERVE IT!  IT IS NOT YOUR FAULT!

Parents – get involved in your daughter’s safety during college.  Parents or Gals……contact me for details as we are gearing up our tour to bring personal safety training (6 hours on one weekend day) to communities everywhere!  Organizers of training’s will train for FREE!

Take care and STAY SAFE!

College campus rape rate 10 times higher than Detroit’s? Don’t believe everything the Justice Department tells you…

September 19, 2010 Comments off

College campus rape rate 10 times higher than Detroit’s.  Don’t believe everything the Justice Department tells you!


As college students poured back into classrooms, ABC Nightline breathlessly reported (and other news outlets and blogs echoed): “A recent study from the Department of Justice estimated that 25 percent  of (1 out of 4) college women will be victims of rape or attempted rape before they graduate within a four-year college period.”

The short statement is enough to make parents think twice before sending their daughter to college. Despite the seriousness of the claim, the hook is riddled with inaccuracies and misrepresentations — not least of which is the actual statistic.

Indeed, nearly 50 percent of the “rape victims” referred to in the report said they had not been raped.

The document in question, “Acquaintance Rape of College Students,” by attorney Rana Sampson, is not a study but rather a report combining and relying on several studies — the largest of which remains problematic.

Sampson released her report more than four years ago and though the Justice Department provided her with some funding, she was not a Justice Department employee. “The opinions contained herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Justice,” the report disclaims.

The one-in-four statistic, according to footnotes, is derived from a study conducted in 2000 called, “The Sexual Victimization of College Women” (SVCW), by Bonnie S. Fisher, Francis T. Cullen and Michael G. Turner.

Dr. Neil Gilbert, a professor of social welfare at University California, Berkeley, told The Daily Caller that the SVCW’s numbers are severely inflated due to the study’s broad definition of rape and the manner in which subjects were questioned.

According to Gilbert, the SVCW study results found a rate of rape that was 10 times higher than when the methodology for the National Crime Victimization Study (NCVS) was used. Namely, “the National Crime Victimization study had a check to make sure that the codes [or definitions of rape, force, etc.] of responses reflected the interviewees precise description. The SVCW study did not use this type of control on coding,” Gilbert explained.

In the SVCW study, researchers asked subjects to explain what happened to them and then decided, using their own definitions, what was and was not rape. The study defined rape in exceptionally wide terms: “Forced sexual intercourse including both psychological coercion as well as physical force. Forced sexual intercourse means vaginal, anal or oral penetration by the offender(s). This category also includes incidents where the penetration is from a foreign object such as a bottle. Includes attempted rapes, male as well as female victims, and both heterosexual and homosexual rape. Attempted rape includes verbal threats of rape.”

The inclusion of the phrase “psychological coercion” as part of the definition greatly increased the number of “victims.”

In an interview with TheDC, Sampson made no distinction between violent rape and regret after seduction. “Rape is rape is rape,” she said. “I think that the kind of harm that one experiences during rape is not something we want to belittle.”

Apart from the hair-raising 25 percent figure, the SVCW study reports that when those categorized as rape victims were asked if what they described was rape, nearly 50 percent said “no.” Further, 80 percent of the subjects researchers labeled as rape victims stated that the incident resulted in neither physical or emotional injuries. Only 5 percent of those identified as victims of rape actually reported the incident. “If an attorney defending a rapist were to use this, they’d say ‘Well, what’s the big deal? 80 percent of women who are raped don’t have any adverse affects,’” Gilbert said.

“It expands the definition in a way that it includes a lot of events — you know sexual activity at that age can be confusing, there is regret after, there are break ups, all kinds of things that go on,” Gilbert said.

But, according to Sampson many women do not actually realized they have been raped. “It often doesn’t register as rape to women because it does not look like the image they have in their mind. It turns out that image is not the most common type of rape and that is why so many people are able to get away with it,” she said.

Manhattan Institute fellow Heather Mac Donald put Sampson’s rape report numbers up against Detroit’s, a city with one of the highest violent crime rates of any city in the country. In that city, at the time of the report’s release, the violent crime rate was 2.4 percent, which includes crimes of rape, murder, assault and robbery.

“If 25 percent of all college women were experiencing a violent crime rate that was 10 times higher than anything experienced in the most violent areas, colleges would be transformed. They would be shut down,” Mac Donald told TheDC. “Parents would not be clamoring to get their daughters into Harvard and Yale and Brown and Wesleyan and every other college. You would have a massive revamping of admissions processes because what this statistic says is that colleges are letting in tens of thousands of violent criminals.”

While reports such as Nightline’s scream about an epidemic, Mac Donald says college rape hotlines are silent. “I mean they are so desperate to find rape that at Yale, for instance, they have thrown out the rule that the accuser has the right to confront his victim, which is a cornerstone of our Anglo-Saxon common law heritage. This is at Yale.”

Gilbert said that the desire to inflate the numbers comes down to funding. “These studies have been used to get funding for women’s centers on college campuses,” Gilbert said. “I call it advocacy research, these people mean well and have legitimate concerns. But at some point they exaggerate so much that it is no longer a problem but the norm and with studies like this they risk doing just that.”

Apart from the hair-raising 25 percent figure, the SVCW study reports that when those categorized as rape victims were asked if what they described was rape, nearly 50 percent said “no.” Further, 80 percent of the subjects researchers labeled as rape victims stated that the incident resulted in neither physical or emotional injuries. Only 5 percent of those identified as victims of rape actually reported the incident. “If an attorney defending a rapist were to use this, they’d say ‘Well, what’s the big deal? 80 percent of women who are raped don’t have any adverse affects,’” Gilbert said.

“It expands the definition in a way that it includes a lot of events — you know sexual activity at that age can be confusing, there is regret after, there are break ups, all kinds of things that go on,” Gilbert said.

But, according to Sampson many women do not actually realized they have been raped. “It often doesn’t register as rape to women because it does not look like the image they have in their mind. It turns out that image is not the most common type of rape and that is why so many people are able to get away with it,” she said.

Manhattan Institute fellow Heather Mac Donald put Sampson’s rape report numbers up against Detroit’s, a city with one of the highest violent crime rates of any city in the country. In that city, at the time of the report’s release, the violent crime rate was 2.4 percent, which includes crimes of rape, murder, assault and robbery.

“If 25 percent of all college women were experiencing a violent crime rate that was 10 times higher than anything experienced in the most violent areas, colleges would be transformed. They would be shut down,” Mac Donald told TheDC. “Parents would not be clamoring to get their daughters into Harvard and Yale and Brown and Wesleyan and every other college. You would have a massive revamping of admissions processes because what this statistic says is that colleges are letting in tens of thousands of violent criminals.”

While reports such as Nightline’s scream about an epidemic, Mac Donald says college rape hotlines are silent. “I mean they are so desperate to find rape that at Yale, for instance, they have thrown out the rule that the accuser has the right to confront his victim, which is a cornerstone of our Anglo-Saxon common law heritage. This is at Yale.”

Gilbert said that the desire to inflate the numbers comes down to funding. “These studies have been used to get funding for women’s centers on college campuses,” Gilbert said. “I call it advocacy research, these people mean well and have legitimate concerns. But at some point they exaggerate so much that it is no longer a problem but the norm and with studies like this they risk doing just that.”

A look at one alarming case of sexual assault on campus, a widespread crime that is vastly underreported.  Some statistics in this clip have changed due to more current reporting and review.

Respectfully submitted via…The Daily Caller, Caroline May

Morgan Harrington’s Murder: A Security Check On Security- Why Did It Fail?

July 22, 2010 2 comments

Morgan Harrington’s Murder: A Security Check On Security- Why Did It Fail?

Via BlinkOnCrime

Charlottesville, VA-

On the afternoon of October 17, 2009, Morgan Harrington and three of her friends drove to John Paul Jones Arena, located on the University of Virginia campus, to attend a long-anticipated Metallica concert. Following an apparent fall and chin injury occurring around the time she was visiting the ladies room, Morgan ended up outside the arena and attempted to gain re-entry to the venue.

How and why she got there comes in at a baffling second only compared to what happened to her next.  Morgan went missing the evening of October 17, 2009; January 26, 2010 Morgan’s body was found on Anchorage Farm located in Albemarle County.  The cause of her death has not be released, her manner of death has been classified as homicide by the VA State Police.

Gil Harrington’s has made it clear that her family’s mission is to prevent what happened to Morgan from happening to another victim and their goal is to educate young women about safety and personal security.

As our very vulnerable student body returns to campus next month, blinkoncrime.com provides a glimpse at current conditions.

Unregulated Regulations In Security

The 2004 General Assembly, through House Joint Resolution (HJR122), requested the Virginia State Crime Commission to study safety at Virginia’s institutions of higher education. As a result, DCJS created the Office of Campus Policing and Security (OCPS) to address the law requiring minimum training and employment standards for campus security officers.

Campus Security Regulations for Institutions of Higher Education in the State of Virginia, fall under the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) Private Security Services Advisory Board. Below is an excerpt of the unapproved draft meeting notes of their quarterly meeting held December 8, 2009; the first and only since Morgan’s disappearance from JPJ.

The issue of safety and security on college campuses was addressed in a 2006 Crime Commission Study on Campus Safety. This study resulted in the statutory requirements under Code of Virginia (Code) §9.1-102 (49).

College populations represent a large concentration of students between the ages of 18-25 years with limited supervision and life experience. In terms of homeland security, campuses are identified as “soft targets” and are frequently targeted by domestic and foreign terrorists. Campuses also house volatile materials and research facilities that are also targeted by radical elements in society. Campuses host large stadium events and concerts that are potential targets for terrorism and riots. Most campuses also have facilities that are open to the public and are relatively difficult to secure and lockdown.   Campus Security Officers are primary first responders to incidents of crime and violence on campus.

Although UVA campus security officers require a certification provided by DCJS, there are ZERO regulatory standards for certification. It was NOT until Morgan Harrington disappeared from the grounds of the JPJ Arena that emergency regulations were sought from Governor Bob McDonnell.

How does a woman on the campus of a University that provides it’s very own Police Department in addition to event security simply vanish without a trace?

By the time Morgan ends up in a hay field 7 miles away, she has passed through 3 different law enforcement jurisdictions and a slew of private campus and event security agencies and personnel.  While private security regulations fall under the umbrella of the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services, they also require a judicial amendment only if and when they are approved via “emergency” status by the Governor.

Who’s Looking Out For The Kids, Exactly?

As the safety on campus study showed, our college age kids are at their most vulnerable in the University setting.  Out from under the watchful eye of Mom and Dad and wading through the rich culture and nightlife of downtown Charlottesville, students face a host of potential safety risks.

In fact, during the very development of this article, I received an alert from UVA security that a UVA student was sexually assaulted in the area of Roosevelt Boulevard. While I commend the swift response and warning from UVA PD chief Michael Gibson, I can’t help but wonder if a similar alert upon learning Morgan disappeared from the UVA/JPJ campus would have made a difference for her.

A simple Google of “Charlottesville security” produces the front page for HH Security Services, Inc, a local private security and bail bonding firm.  I am no expert but isn’t it a bit odd to claim to protect one’s security and then bond out someone that may threaten it in the first place?

Who is vetting the security that is responsible for ensuring safety?

While HH Security or it’s employees have no known ties whatsoever to the Harrington case, it is a prime example of the weakness of current security regulations, involving students and private events, 6 years in the making.

At H & H Security Services, Inc. we specialize in Private Investigation, Private Security both armed and unarmed as well as fast efficient Civil Process Service.  Our full-time professional agents are well trained, well equipped, well informed, and discreet.? Owner Rod Howard is a native of Charlottesville and central Virginia, where he’s been a well respected business owner for over twenty years. H & H Security Services, Inc. is his vehicle in his effort to help serve and protect the community he grew up in. Over the years he’s assembled a team of certified and experienced personnel who share his commitment to the safety of the community.

HH Security, in a business journal ad, claims to hire members of law enforcement and be very well connected with various police departments and security agencies for nightclubs, special events and home security checks as well in 2007.

HH Security is the security firm of choice for Club 216, Buffalo Wild Wings, and Rivals, which are bars frequently visited by UVA students and athletes.

Roderick M Howard, owner of HH Security and H&H Car detailing maintains active licenses issued through the VA Dept of Criminal Justice Services for private security and as a bailbondsman.

While blinkoncrime editors were researching this piece, a review of Albemarle County Court records show Roderick Howard was arrested for felony rape in 1993, subsequently indicted for same and a year later on the first day of trial, pled guilty to misdemeanor sexual battery whereby he was sentenced to 12 months, 11 of which were suspended and two years unsupervised probation. Howard was also arrested a few times for felony bad checks; both cases ended nolle prosequi.

How can an accused rapist and convicted sexual batterer hold a dual license in the private security sector as well as two classifications of firearms, all of which is monitored by the VADCJS? It is specifically stated in the regulations regarding moral turpitude AND sexual battery that the VADCJS MAY DENY an applicant on those grounds.

According to Mr. Howard’s own advertisement, he has been in the security industry since 1989. Would that mean he was employed in the security field when he was arrested for rape?

Shockingly, It may be perfectly legal. Although the administrative statute for licensure prohibits granting a license to someone with a misdemeanor sexual battery conviction, if Howard divulged the crime in his application and requested a waiver from the director at the time, it is possible one was granted.

Blinkoncrime.com spoke to Lisa McGee, Regulatory Program Manager for DCJS, private security advisory committee:

“…there is a code in the statute that allows the potential for both an individual convicted of a felony and the outlined misdemeanors exceptions contained therein to obtain a director’s waiver. Two felonies we would never even consider are rape and murder, but dependent upon the criminal offense, the circumstances and the length of time that has transpired with a clean record, the verbiage in the statute would allow an applicant to at least request a waiver for our consideration…”  Lisa McGee

Ms. McGee was not able to address Mr. Howard’s file specifically, citing privacy laws, but she was able to verify that Mr. Howard’s registration with the agency is current.

There are however, some discrepancies in the press release written to announce the “restructuring” of both companies, announced October 19th.

For starters, there was only a name change to Mr. Howard’s business, which actually took place prior to the October 19 release date, in May, 2009.

These are not two separate businesses. In fact, the bailbondsman license issued to Mr. Howard’s agent, Anthony Halstead, leads back to Accelerated Bail Bonds, which is not a listed entity in the state of Virginia or listed as a fictitious name for H&H Security Services.

I would be willing to wager that the police departments that allow off duty security employment with this firm would appreciate some clarification on both the personnel and licensing issues.

There has been no arrest in the homicide of Morgan Harrington. In a statement released by Corrine Geller, PR manager for the Virginia State Police, VSP has received approximately 100 significant leads from the release of the sketch of the alleged perpetrator of the 2005 Fairfax County sex assault.

Dan and Gil Harrington will be meeting with new University of Virginia President, Teresa Sullivan, next month to address safety and security issues on campus.

“..People think it cannot happen to them, IT CAN– Dan Harrington.”

Editors Note: I am not a resident of Virginia. However, I think the interest of the safety of our children is a National one. Any person that is placed in a position of public trust, most especially those that come into contact with our vulnerable students, should be REQUIRED to disclose past convictions that would negate them that position without some sort of subjective “pass”.  How can we know-TRULY KNOW the level of presumed safety if we really aren’t aware of the backgrounds of those in charge of it?

Blinkoncrime.com editors Jason Mateos, Elizabeth Morton and Madeline Tanner contributed to this report

Images by Klaasend

Respectfully submitted via BlinkOnCrime – thank you to all that continue to bring much needed attention and awareness to crimes on campuses and the lack of security for our young people.

Reminding Students New College & University Campus Safety Information Is Available Under Federal Clery Act – Check for updates in September, 2010…

“The Clery Act information provides students and families with an important starting point for evaluating campus safety,” added Jonathan Kassa, SOC’s Executive Director. “While differences in campus environments make a strict ranking system difficult, these disclosures make it possible to have a side-by-side comparison of the level of security provided by different institutions and to ask informed questions.”

Many institutions make their complete ASR available on their websites according to SOC. Crime statistics for each institution can be accessed via SOC’s website at http://www.securityoncampus.org/.

Please be sure to check out your college/university of choice.

Do not allow any college or university to “cover-up” any assault. Know your rights, follow-up on your reporting and PRESS CHARGES!  Do not allow anyone at any college or university to “hush” a report.  You do have options, know your rights!

And, research…know every aspect of the security in place for every function.  It’s your safety – you can only depend on yourself to be sure that you will remain safe.  There is nothing wrong with learning and knowing how to be YOUR OWN BODYGUARD.

Take care and STAY SAFE!

Reminding Students New College & University Campus Safety Information Is Available Under Federal Clery Act…

July 14, 2010 1 comment

Reminding Students New College & University Campus Safety Information Is Available Under Federal Clery Act – Check for updates in September, 2010…

Students ReadingKing of Prussia, PA – Security On Campus, Inc. (SOC), the only national non-profit devoted exclusively to preventing crime on college campuses, is reminding both prospective and current college students that this is the week colleges across the country will be disclosing their latest crime statistics and other campus security information. Under the federal Jeanne Clery Act, a law SOC spearheaded passage of in 1990, colleges must release an Annual Security Report (ASR) with campus crime statistics and a summary of campus security procedures by each October 1st.

“This information empowers students and their families to make informed decisions about where they plan to go to college and how to protect themselves once they are on campus,” said Connie Clery, who co-founded SOC with her late husband, Howard, after their daughter Jeanne was murdered in her college residence hall in 1986. “Tragically, we didn’t have this information when we were looking at schools with Jeanne. Her legacy has become protecting countless millions of students who now are entitled to know how safe they are on campus.”

The Act, formally the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (20 USC § 1092(f)), applies to more than 6,000 public and private institutions of postsecondary education that participate in federal student aid programs.

Under the Act institutions must disclose the three most recent years worth of crime statistics for each campus as well as public areas such as streets and sidewalks near the campus and student organization housing and remote classrooms. They must also disclose information concerning things like the security of and access to campus facilities, whether campus security personnel are police or unsworn security, and rights for victims in sexual assault cases.

“The Clery Act information provides students and families with an important starting point for evaluating campus safety,” added Jonathan Kassa, SOC’s Executive Director. “While differences in campus environments make a strict ranking system difficult, these disclosures make it possible to have a side-by-side comparison of the level of security provided by different institutions and to ask informed questions.”

Many institutions make their complete ASR available on their websites according to SOC. Crime statistics for each institution can be accessed via SOC’s website at http://www.securityoncampus.org/.



Please be sure to check out your college/university of choice.


Do not allow any college or university to “cover-up” any assault. Know your rights, follow-up on your reporting and PRESS CHARGES!  Do not allow anyone at any college or university to “hush” a report.  You do have options, know your rights!


The findings of “Sexual Assault on Campus: A Frustrating Search for Justice” a nine month investigation by the Center for Public Integrity into how colleges handle sexual assault complaints is discussed by Kristen Lombardi one of the project’s lead reporters. The 2009 report found “Institutional barriers compound the problem of silence, and few victims in fact make it to a campus hearing. Those who do come forward can encounter secret disciplinary proceedings, closed-mouth school administrations, and off-the-record negotiations.”

Take care and STAY SAFE!


Eve Carson Murder Suspect Pleads Guilty, Dodges Federal Death Penalty…

May 25, 2010 Comments off

Eve Carson Murder Suspect Pleads Guilty, Dodges Federal Death Penalty…

HILLSBOROUGH, N.C. — One of two men charged in the slaying of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill student body president Eve Carson pleaded guilty Monday to first-degree murder, avoiding a possible death sentence for his role in the March 2008 crime.

Superior Court Judge Allen Baddour sentenced Demario James Atwater to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Last month, Atwater also avoided the death penalty by pleading guilty to five federal charges in the case, including carjacking resulting in death and kidnapping, in exchange for a life sentence without parole.

Under the agreement with the state, Atwater will serve his sentence in federal custody.

“Mr. Atwater, what you have admitted to doing was senseless, as it’s been said by two attorneys before me,” Baddour said. “It was wrong. It can have no place in our free society.”

Atwater also pleaded guilty to robbery with a dangerous weapon, first-degree kidnapping and possession of a firearm by a felon. Charges of felonious larceny, possession of a weapon of mass destruction and possession of stolen goods were dismissed.

Baddour sentenced Atwater to 275 to 349 months on the remaining charges, to be served concurrently with the life sentence.

Carson’s mother, father and brother, from Athens, Ga., were present for the hearing and offered a statement, read by Raleigh attorney Wade Smith.

“We won’t be talking to the court about how our lives are diminished without Eve. The effects of her death are both obvious and personal. We choose not to confront Demario Atwater. The selfishness of taking another’s life is incomprehensible, and this coward is unaddressable,” Smith read.

The family continued, saying the life sentence “is consistent with the wishes of our family and honors Eve’s love of life and all people.”

A representative for UNC-Chapel Hill said the university would not comment on Atwater’s plea.

“There’s been so much made that Eve was the president of the student body at UNC, and that was a great accomplishment, and she had done many great things,” Orange County District Attorney Jim Woodall said. “But I think she was – she was a sister, she was a daughter – and to me, that’s probably more important than anything.”

“I just hope, by what we’re doing today, we can help the family. We can give them some sense of closure as it relates to this defendant,” he continued. “I wish we could do more. We can’t.”

Atwater had nothing to say, but his attorney, Jonathan Broun, extended sympathy to the Carson family.

“We knew that allowing a sentence that, while harsh and severe as it should be, will allow him to live. We know they are doing that, not as a favor to Mr. Atwater, but because of the love that they feel for Eve Carson, and we appreciate it.”

New details revealed

Police found Carson’s body in the early morning of March 5, 2008, in a neighborhood several blocks from the UNC campus while responding to reports of gunshots.

An autopsy found she was shot four times with a 25-caliber handgun and once – the fifth and fatal shot – with a sawed-off Harrington & Richardson 12-gauge shotgun.

“She had placed her (right) hand up to shield her head, whenever the shotgun was fired,” Woodall said, outlining the facts of the case. “The medical examiner believed that she would have survived for some period of time, as to the gunshot wounds from the 25-caliber handgun.”

Atwater and his alleged accomplice, Laurence Alvin Lovette Jr., went to Carson’s home, abducted her and took her in her blue Toyota Highlander to withdraw $1,400 from ATM machines before killing her, Woodall said.

“All the other evidence tends to support that Eve Carson was – they confronted and took her from her home – if not actually inside her home, just outside her home,” Woodall said.

Atwater later admitted to his girlfriend at the time, Shanita Love, what had happened, and he told about a dozen other people parts of what happened that night, Woodall said.

The crime was random, Atwater admitted, and he and Lovette, who is still awaiting trial, had been in Chapel Hill looking for people to rob.

What investigators were never able to determine was where Atwater and his alleged accomplice kidnapped Carson. There were a couple of different stories, he told, about how she was abducted, Woodall said.

“He told (Love) that they had gone into a sorority house through an open door and got Ms. Carson,” he said.

“There was never any evidence discovered, other than this statement, that anyone went into the house,” Woodall continued.

Other evidence also put Atwater and Lovette in Chapel Hill and near Carson’s home that morning.

Around 3:30 a.m., Woodall said, a woman reported seeing “two suspicious black males” in the area of Rosemary Street near the house where Carson lived on Friendly Lane.

Video footage showed the men, identified as Atwater and Lovette, walking and, a few minutes later, driving by in Carson’s SUV.

Lovette also used a cell phone that could be traced to Franklin Street, about a mile from Carson’s home, at 3:02 a.m., Woodall said.

After Atwater’s arrest, police also found Carson’s iPod in his truck and shotgun shells consistent with the murder weapon in his home.

DNA evidence in Carson’s SUV also linked Atwater to the crime, Woodall said.

“That is some of the evidence in this case,” he said. “This is a case where there is literally a mountain of evidence, and it seems clear that the defendant was the one who fired the shotgun on this occasion.”

Respectfully submitted via WRAL.com

Are College Campus Administrations Really “Getting It”?…

May 12, 2010 Comments off

Yeardly Love’s family is beginning their healing process of losing a child, a loved one.  George Hugely’s family is in the midst of trying to understand the devastating crime that their son has committed and supporting him with love.  Friends and students are trying to stay focused as the semester comes to an end with finals and day-to-day life.  The UVA lacrosse team members (female and male) move into tough practices filled with emotions yet knowing that Yeardley would want them to participate in the upcoming tournament. And, UVA Administration is in the midst of looking at ways that they can combat the possibility of ever experiencing such a tragedy again.  But…are the college administrations really “getting it”?

I say “no” the administrators are not totally “getting it”.

Putting into place the requirement of background checks, receiving alerts if a student has a “run-in” with the law and understanding, acknowledging and being proactive about intimate dating violence within the student body are totally different.

While I feel that proposed policies that UVA is looking into in order to protect the “liability of a college/university” is being proactive from a business stance; the “liability” of being proactive for the student body is not.

I do not believe that administrators are “getting it” when it comes to understanding intimate partner dating violence.  They do not understand that an abuser doesn’t necessarily have “run-ins” with the law nor any criminal history.  For God’s sake we have law enforcement and military personnel who are abusers – get my drift?  An abuser does not necessarily “fit a mold”.

College administrators do not understand that our young people do not know, are not educated nor understand the warning signs and red flags of abuse.  Administrations do not understand that it is imperative to require faculty members to be “educated” about signs of abuse. It should be stipulated within a faculty members contract that “abuse and assault continuing education is an annual requirement”.  And, if suspected it must be reported, acknowledged, investigated and must be held accountable.

So while they are putting into place all of the “business liability” precautions they are still doing nothing to assist the student body (females and males). They are not putting into place any “requirements” for education for students from a proactive stance.

Isn’t that what college is ALL about – the students, their education/life skills, their safety, their dreams?

Men Can Stop Rape PSA Campaign Will Reach 3.6M Tennesseans!

April 30, 2010 1 comment

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Men Can Stop Rape PSA Campaign Will Reach 3.6M Tennesseans

This week the Tennessee Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence and Verizon Wireless announced the “My Strength is Not for Hurting” an educational campaign that we (Men Can Stop Rape) were asked to create for them. Check out the banner (above) and video PSA (below).

From TCADSV’s press release:
‘My Strength’ is a public awareness initiative focused on preventing first-time perpetration of sexual violence. The campaign works with young men and centers on the theme, “My Strength is Not for Hurting,” which emphasizes positive masculinity and enables men to utilize their strength to stand up and speak out against sexual violence. The campaign launches statewide in April and includes digital billboards and television and radio public service announcements.

“Statistics show that one in five female high school students reports being physically and/or sexually abused by a dating partner,” comments Kathy England Walsh, Executive Director of the Tennessee Coalition. Walsh continues, “This campaign will help us get the message out to 3.6 million Tennesseans that young men can prevent violence and break the cycle of abuse.”

“Verizon Wireless is proud to support the Tennessee Coalition’s effort to bring awareness to a topic like domestic abuse and violence, which effects one in three women in their lifetime,” comments Jerry Fountain, President of Verizon Wireless in the Carolinas and Tennessee region.

We sell similar posters, banners, and postcards on our website, www.mencanstoprape.org. We can create a tailored campaign for your organization or community.